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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,364 (some duplicates have been removed)
, elected officials, for joining us today on this solemn occasion in this very solemn weekend of remembrance of one of the worst and tragic events in the history of our country. so we wanted to make this quick. we wanted to make it respectful, and we wanted to make it a very solemn occasion, which i think is the way it should be treated. the first thing that we're going to do here today, i know i asked everybody to sit down, but i will ask you to stand up again to observe a moment of silence for all of those that lost their lives on 9/11. >> thank you. years ago, in the san francisco fire department, when a firefighter was killed in the line of duty, bells are rung nine times at each fire house throughout the city. this was known as the chaplains call. in honor of this tradition, firefighter gregory ginatti will now ring the bell nine times for the firefighters and police officers who gave their lives on 9/11. [bell rings nine times] >> thank you, greg. now for the invocation. i would like to introduce father john green, chaplain of the san francisco firefighters, and the chaplain for the sa
would also like to thank you for joining us here today as we honor the americans lost their lives 10 years ago. is an american tradition to honor fellow citizens who have made the ultimate sacrifice. congresswoman pelosi quoted abraham lincoln earlier. i think what he also said 150 years at the dedication of the national cemetery at gettysburg applies as much today as it did then. lincoln said that the world will little note nor long remember what we said here, but it can never forget what they did. over 2900 people were killed 10 years ago in the attacks on the world trade center. for the 16 of those who perished or our brother and sister firefighters -- 416 of those who perished work our brother and sister firefighters. 25,000 other lives worse. because of them. none of us will ever forget where we were on the morning of september 11, 2001. at police headquarters in san francisco, we watched in horror as the images were replayed on every channel. we learned one of the airplane is believed to be hijacked was heading to san this is good. later, we learned flight 93 went down in penns
a note of caution. the same spirit of cooperation and focus that has gotten us to this point with one will be an overwhelming vote i hope is unanimous. we need to keep going so that this isn't a casualty of the back and forth process in the house and senate. the senate played a large role in giving it in the first place. we need to make sure that it is not caught up in the larger dramas that occur around here that we can keep our eye on the ball and fix it. and i do want to say just one brief word about the pay for. it is illusory because it would cost far more than we would ever collect but we have to deal with the rules as they are. there are two proposals. one would tighten eligibility for the health care reform. the other would take away some unnecessary tax benefits to large oil companies that long ago ceased to have any impact on oil exploration or reducing price. but while i actually think the pay for from our side of the aisle dealing with the oil tax adjustment is superior, i think it is a practical matter. we are going to have to do both of these in the months ahead if we ar
of apprenticeships spirit i excepts. he must not abandon the plan that has given us record low interest rates. >> this is not working. today's figures show it is not working. it is his failure that means we -- whatly 1,000,001 peopl this government is pledged to do is everything we can to get our economy moving. that is why we cut corporation tax and why we are reforming the system. this is why we created the zone. i know what he wants. he wants us to change course on reducing our deficit. we would end up with interest rates like portugal and spain and italy. we it would send our economy into a tailspin. >> we want people to get back to work. what the prime minister does not seem to understand that unemployment goes month of. the cost goes up. hear people are in work. teen-age a credible flight for growth. it is not just young people. when was the last time the unemployment reached a level it has today. >> he is wrong. there are 50,000 more men and women than there were at the time of the election. there are half a million more credible jobs. he specifically asked about a credible growth plan
warranted. however, u.s. industrial and consumer products going to panama face an average duty of 7%. and u.s. agricultural exports face an average tariff of 15%. implementing this agreement will level the playing field for u.s. exporters by drastically reducing or ending panama's tariff on u.s. goods. most u.s. consumer and industrial products will immediately become duty-free as will half of u.s. farm exports. any remaining tariffs will decrease quickly thereafter. opening panama's market will be a boone for u.s. companies, workers and farmers. the panamanian economy is rapidly growing and is expected to more than double by 2020. panama is already one of the largest markets for some u.s. exporters and service firms. the importance of panama will only grow for these firms and others as we gain greater access to this expanding economy. this is also true for our farmers. whose exports to panama are expected to significantly increase under the agreement. not only will american farmers benefit from lower tariffs into panama, they will also benefit from the removal of nontariff and regu
agencies they may look and go, oh, this cloud is outside the u.s. perhaps i don't want to use it for one of my applications, but i can use it for another one. different agencies and even within an agency you have different needs. so to answer the question, for the cloud today i don't think that you're going to see any classifieded information because that's not included in the profile, and it might be a long time before that's coming. you won't see high-risk systems, systems that could endanger an agency if compromised. but there's a lot of low-risk and moderate-risk systems today that can be moved to the cloud. an organization that is involved in cybersecurity or information that's involved in federal government planning, they may decide to either keep it in house or use it in a cloud within the u.s. whereas an organization or a federal agency that's supporting workers all over the globe may want to use a cloud that's all over the globe recognizing they're making a choice, and they can see the risks they're documents. so i think we'll see low and moderate-risk operations moving. >> host
arrested in connection with the plot. one of them a u.s. citizen. appeared in a federal courthouse today. let's go out front. i'm erin burnett. out front a major terror plot on u.s. soil foiled. a senior administration official tells me this was international murder for hire. here's what we've been told. two men charged in an alleged plot to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the united states. one is a naturalized u.s. citizen in custody and identified as 56-year-old mondaysor ar bab si ar. he appeared in a courthouse this afternoon. he did not enter a plea. according to the complaint that we read, he planned for someone to kill the saudi arabian ambassador at one of his favorite restaurants in washington, d.c. he told an informant that mass casualties didn't matter, saying, "if the hundred go with him, expletive, them." the plot itself is a work of intrigue. it began this spring when he met in mexico with a d.e.a. informant posing as a member of a violent drug cartel. over the next few months, he got the informant to agree to assassinate the ambassador for a fee o$1.5 million.
report. blind sided by terror. u.s. soldiers and civilian employees killed in a single deadliest ambush on americans in the afghan capital since the war began. fox reports live from kabul on the latest high profile attacks and now part of a disturbing trend and taking in a big haul coast guard style. >> seven times is about one third of what all of the street cops on land in the united states will catch in a given year. >> tonight, busting submarines loaded with cocaine before they reach u.s. shores. >> plus, remember this? summertime disaster in indiana. the deadly stage collapse as fans watched in horror. tonight, the rejuvenating spirit of sugar land. >> he so wonderful to see the emotion that they felt. >> i was hoping it would be a healing process for all of us, and it was. >> now, the show goes on. >> a car bomb explodes in afghanistan, and the aftermath is chilling. our top military officials calling it the deadliest single ground attack in that nation's capital since the war began. 12 americans among the deadment the taliban claiming responsibility. and this is war so the video
amendment and bill us ouof the congress will not. we're sad because of too much concentrated wealth, subsidized and born of government protection, too much poverty borne of government neglect, to many of wars, to my children killing children, too many jobs leaving and too much drugs coming. we can and malnutrition now. we can relieve sudent loan debt now. dr. king would be said that america had a moment and history of historic proportions in 2008 but they elected barack obama. yet that reduction has been met with unrelenting retribution, retaliation, then on and on printed -- unprecedented opposition. people seem to be willing to sink the ship just to destroy the captain. we have to be bter than that. [applause] like lyndon baines johnson, poverty was restored in the great society. dr. king would not settle for shifting the chairs on the deck of the titanic. he wanted to plug the holes to stop the water from coming in. 43 years after dr. king's plan and occupation on this same sp, he would say to the occupiers on wl street,he movement has gone global and you are the offspring of dr.
blitzer in the shutation room, it starts right now. >> fear the u.s. could soon be facing yet another credit downgrade. eyes and pressure on the congressional super committee. stand by. new information coming in. also, u.s. troops weeks away from leaving iraq. will iran move to fill some sort of void? i will talk about that and more this hour. with iraq's ambassador to the united states. he has strong views. >>> and karl rove warning rick perry is making a big mistake by signing on to one controversial issue many people thought would settle. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in the "the situation room." >>> president obama is going around congress for his latest plan. he is out west focusing in on the ongoing housing crisis that continues to drag down the u.s. economy. he wants it make it easier for a homeowners who are under water to refinance and he is unveiling his plan in one of hardest hit housing markets in the country. we are talking about las vegas nevada. jessica is joining us now with details. jessica, what is the president doing? >> he is rolling out a new plan to help homeowners dr
, and it has carried us to our destination. have you ever wondered how elevators were -- work? we check out the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildi
that bill. white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president and joins us live from pittsburgh. hi, there, dan. is the president preparing for the possibility that his jobs bill may not pass today's test in the senate? >> reporter: it it does appear that he is. in fact, he's meeting with his jobs council and a short minute ago he was asked about this and the president responded, saying, he doesn't know how congress will respond to the overall jobs bill but the expectation is that if in fact they don't pass it, as one entire piece, that it would be broken into parts. they would certainly push for the infrastructure component of that and then pressure would be applied later to get all of those other pieces done. but what the white house really wants is for this whole package to be taken up in one piece because they believe that's the only way to really get the economy going to create the kinds of jobs that the president would like to see. >> and when you look at this package, dan, we're talking $447 billion. one of sticking points is obviously taxing the rich. they do
called "reimagining equality." we are glad you can join us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where walmart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: and the cahill is a professor for social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis. she was employed at the eeoc. that led to her testimony on the supreme court confirmation hearings of clarence thomas 20 years ago. her newest book is called "reimagining equality, stories of gender, race, and finding home." good to have you back on this program. we were talking before you came on the air. with the advent of the internet and 24 hour cable
it will consider that bill. white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president and joins us live from pittsburgh. hi, there, dan. is the president preparing for the possibility that his jobs bill may not pass today's test in the senate? >> reporter: it it does appear that he is. in fact, he's meeting with his jobs council and a short minute ago he was asked about this and the president responded, saying, he doesn't know how congress will respond to the overall jobs bill but the expectation is that if in fact they don't pass it, as one entire piece, that it would be broken into parts. they would certainly push for the infrastructure component of that and then pressure would be applied later to get all of those other pieces done. but what the white house really wants is for this whole package to be taken up in one piece because they believe that's the only way to really get the economy going to create the kinds of jobs that the president would like to see. >> and when you look at this package, dan, we're talking $447 billion. one of sticking points is obviously taxing the rich. the
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
correspondent is in brussels and has been following today's talks. he told us more about her stance. >> she said that she had talks with the rest of the commission over lunch. they were pressing upon angela merkel that her backing was required because of her status as the leader of the wealthiest countries in the european union. she seems to have come on board. a week ago in berlin, she was saying that there must be changed. she said today, we will see later about that. it might be necessary. she is changing her 10 slightly on bad. she is falling in behind the commission, demanding strong support from all around the state. >> it was a day of waiting and frustration for anyone wanting to travel in and out of greece today. >> a general strike force the cancellation of all flights in the country. >> of thousands of workers took to the streets of athens to protest millions of jobs cuts. >> and job cuts and wage reductions are elements of the savings greece needs to make in order to qualify for more bailout to help. >> the chance is never -- the chant is "never." a stable never accept the government
and that means holiday sales are just weeks away. "consumer reports" tells us about some of the season's best laptop computers and why you need to be looking now. >> rick: we begin with new fallout after president obama's decision to end the war in iraq and pull all u.s. troops from the region by the end of the year. the president defending his decision, saying it's time it start focusing on the u.s. economy. but the move is raising red flags with some republicans in washington over security, safety and iraq's ability to keep the peace. molly henneberg is live in washington with more. why does the president believe that now is the right time to bring those u.s. troops home from iraq? >> hi, rick. the president says the strategy to end the war has succeeded. he also says he campaigned on a promise to bring the war in iraq to a, quote, responsible end. and now he's following through on it. >> we've already removed more than 100,000 troops and iraqi forces have taken full responsibility for the security of their own country. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our men and women in uniform,
landmark fiedha re bh aeent 13rsy a sou kea presidt. >>> the u.s. free trade agreement with south ff early as next january. the move could bst jan's chief export competitor in asia. how will the fta benefit the u.s. and southkoa? a 2.5% tariff now imposed on n u.s. will be eliminated within five yes. ut korean import duties on american beef and pork removed after a certain period of time. this is a tvom ms in south korea. >> the ad is sponsored by the sore gerenthcotrisroti free trade under the strong leadership of president lee myung-bak. >> translator: our country needs to expd toheor ony. the fta is a core national strategy. >> with trade accounting for nearly half thor's gd t psintas song belief that going overseas is the only path for further development. japan, on the other hand, only began preliminy lkwi t eun y r an economic partnershiagreem japan is lagging far behind its neighbor in terms of free trade. jane bins ads e concerned that the u.s./south korean trade pact could erode the competitiveness of japanese cars and tvs and hurt exports. >>ralar: a free trade pact can
." hello and thank you for joining us. the police in the united states say people have been killed and one other critically wounded in a shooting at a hair salon in the southeast of los angeles. a man was arrested at a roadblock at about 800 meters from the scene. police say a number of weapons have now been seized. he opened fire at a small shopping center at seal beach, a seaside town in orange county in southern california. we can get the very latest from our correspondent, peter, in los angeles. >> do we know anything more about the person who has -- is believed to have carried out the shooting? gretzky was arrested shortly after the shooting -- >> he was arrested shortly after the shooting, just a few hundred meters away. we do not know the name of the man. it was a white male. but we are hearing reports from eyewitnesses that this may have been a man who was in dispute with his ex-wife, who was at the salon, and they may have been involved in some sort of custody battle. police have a knowledge that their inquiries are focusing on a likely relationship between the alleged gun man and
with illnesses were blocked from getting out of the plane. and abc's lisa stark brings us the first answers tonight. >> reporter: this is what greeted passengers when they finally escaped their parked planes. a foot of snow and a long walk. >> we've been here now for seven and a half hours. >> reporter: that was the captain of jetblue flight 504 with 123 passengers. one of those planes stuck in the snowy tarmac at the hartford, connecticut, airport. >> chaotic. uncomfortable, disorganized. just a mess. >> reporter: andrew carter was on that flight, normally a two-houg jog from florida to new jersey. but the plane couldn't land after newark after the airport lost critical navigation equipment. the pilots diverted to the hartford airport, 100 miles away. jetblue says that airport was overwhelmed with nearly two dozen over diverted flights. and today, we learned why the passengers were trapped. flight 504 was boxed in on the tarmac. a delta plane behind, another jetblue flight to the right, a broken jetway on the left. inside the plane, snacks and water ran out, toilets backed up. >> i have a
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surged 26% and revenues posted an even bigger gain. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. t
, the u.s. chamber of commerce, and the brookings institution discussed the role of the u.s. government and the imf, and the implications for the u.s. economy. this is two hours. >> hearing today is on the year zone debt crisis and implications to the united states. ask unanimous consent mr. lynn of massachusetts and mr. greene from texas both members of the financial services committee can silt in with the must members of the subcommittee today for purposes of delivering a testimony and asking the witnesses questions today. we limit time to 10 minute, and i recognize myself for as much time as i might consume. today we're focused on the eurozone debt crisis and impact on the u.s. economy. despite the systems, the e.u., international monetary fund, imf, greece, portugal, and italy plunged into the deep this year. the economies show sign of strain. in the past year, there's a series of credit rating downgrades for many e.u. members following the grounds of stress tests on important european banks. these rating agencies warned about the risks associated with the global connectedness of ba
of things they can use to be basically. >> did you want to comment? >> i think i agree with you that i believe we should look at it. we have a different color coming in every year. how do we know what the future will look like? what people are looking for in their retirement system. it may make the military more enticing to come and if an individual thinks they may have something they can take with them. also, even though you have a gi bill, i think that is an outstanding benefits. whistle have an individual who will be separated possibly during drawdown with 12 years of service. i think we need to look at that. that is what we will do. >> to read very much. we will proceed to mr. kaufman of colorado. >> i guess my first question is, some of the testimony reference to that it is a relatively low percentage of payroll that supports the retirement system but nobody has said what that is. i wonder if somebody can give me a percentage number. >> at this point we have some of the numbers i would like to take a for the record, please. >> very well. i just think -- first of all, i agree with
to the global economy. if not, they might sink into a global recession. >> we have heard the u.s. say that europe must get its act together and putting extreme pressure on them reaching a solution. is there anything the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> know. from the point of european leaders, it is pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. i think what is different in europe is that the banking sector is much bigger. this is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. the sovran crisis is much bigger. the stakes are higher and many governments have to come together. -- the sovereign crisis is much higher. >> thank you for joining us. rescue workers in turkey are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled out from the rubble. one of them is a university student and was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake. rescue workers broke into the floor as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's h
. special report on the very young who is being shipped from the heat -- uganda to the uk for use in witchcraft. and taking a shortcut -- one marathon runner from the 26 miles a bit too much, butangt the bus certainly helped. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also or around the globe. there is heavy fighting in libya denied as troops of the national libyan council push hard into the city intosirte. fighters in the gaddafi stronghold have put up surprisingly fierce resistance, but now, according to bbc reporters who are with forces of the government, there are only a few streets still left in the hands of gaddafi loyalists. >> a war that has lasted nine months across libya has come down to a few streets and suburbs in colonel gaddafi cozy home town. the fighting on the streets of sirte is ferocious and intense. the town is being pummeled and pounded into submission. a place gaddafi favored above all others in libya flattened block by block. after a battle that lasted more than a week, this day began with soldiers from the new government loading their ammunition belts for
into recession and take the rest of us with them. >> we have heard the u.s. say that you're past to get their act together. is any thing that the u.s. can do in practical terms at this point? >> no. from the point of view of european leaders, it is a pretty rich to hear tim geithner telling them what to do. the u.s. did act quickly after their own financial crisis. the banking sector is four times the size of the u.s. banking sector. this often crisis is much bigger, the stakes are much higher. this is a much more difficult situation. much more complex. >> thank you. >> in turkey, rescue workers are continuing to search for survivors from the earthquake. two people have been pulled from the rubble. one of them is a university t student that was found alive 60 hours after the earthquake struck. rescue workers broke into applause as he emerged from the debris. our correspondent sent this report. >> slowly, they are digging down into the heart of the masses of concrete that were once people's homes. they are pulling away the masonry piece by piece. four days on, they have heard no signs of life. new
that did so much for this country, let us draw strength from those earlier struggles. first and foremost, let us remember that change has never been quick. change has never been simple or with without controversy. change depends on persistenceç. change requires determination. it took a full decade before the moral guidance of brown vs. board of education was translated ininto enforcement measures of the civil rights act and the voting rights act. those 10 long years did not lead dr. king to give up. he kept pushing, speaking, marching, until change finally came. [ applause ] >> the president: and then when even after the civil rights act and the voting rights act passed, african-americans still found themselves trapped in pockets ofç poverty across the country. dr. king didn't say those laws were a failure. he didn't say this is too hard. he didn't say let's settle for what we got and go home. instead, he said, let's take those victories and broaden our mission to achieve not just civil and political equality, but also economic justice. let's fight for a living wage and better school
guy, towards the person who didn't know how to use a computer. i think you don't often see that in other companies. i have covered a lot of these companies. i don't think they really take the care. he really did care. he was a difficult boss at times, people will tell you that. but he had a way of bringing people up to do their best work. people would say yeah, he was difficult but he's a genius. his head designer came up with amazing designs. they worked closely together where, in away, technology takes a backstage to the thing you want to use it for. so people would fall in love with the device. they could make it theirs. >> you think his death marks the end of an era? >> i really do. i have sat and listened to him unvail a product now over a dozen times. and there was something about him. i was at apple the day before he died. they unvailed the iphone 4 s. tim cook got up there. he has a nice way about him, but he's not steve jobs. there was something about the passion that steve had that just came through. i don't think we will see that again, you know. >> tim cook, he
find out how you can help. visit us at uso.org. the uso. until every one comes home. >>> terror alert. americans are warned to be warned. sit down, show down. republican presidential candidates go after herman cain as mitt romney wins a key endorsement. >>> the road to recovery. months after a brutal beating in l.a., a san francisco giants fan finally leaves the hospital. >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for wednesday, october 12th, 2011. good morning. thanks for joining us. i'm betty nguyen. >>> the state department i should a worldwide travel alert overnight warning americans of potential terror attacks sponsored by iran, this follows a spoiled terror plot. an alleged murder for hire plan targeting the saudi baeambassad to the united states on soil. one is arrested and one is on the run. susan mcginnis is in washington with details on this. good morning, susan. what is the latest. >> reporter: this has stunned washington. just simply the idea that iran would solicit the murder for high from a mexican drug cartel to kill the saudi ambassador and has all levels of the u.s. gov
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,364 (some duplicates have been removed)